Your dog's dental health

A puppy has thirty-two teeth at birth and by the age of about four months, has a full complement of forty-two adult teeth. The adult teeth wear down rather quickly depending on the dog's eating and play habits. This is why dogs should not be given stones or hard toys. During growth spurts, a dog's teeth can be affected by various defects. First, baby teeth frequently do not fall out, especially in small breeds. These supernumerary teeth should be extracted if the dog shows signs of pain when eating. Conversely, several teeth may be missing but this will not cause problems in eating. Abnormal teeth position can also be observed, which among other things, prevent the mouth from closing properly. Some teeth may appear to be abnormally formed, with for example, poor quality enamel.

Dogs also suffer frequently from abscesses or fistula. Although rare, they may also develop tooth decay just like humans. In either case, only a veterinarian can determine whether the tooth needs to be extracted or whether dental treatment is required. However, the most frequently-encountered problem in dogs is and remains, tartar buildup. Tartar buildup causes the animal's mouth to emit a characteristic putrid odor known as halitosis. Moreover, the tartar causes severe lesions on the teeth and gums, which may result in loss of the teeth. This problem can evolve into gingival pyorrhea or parondotosis. The animal suffers immensely and can no longer feed itself. At this stage, the only relief for the dog is extraction of some, if not all of the teeth. This is why it is necessary to check the dog's teeth and if necessary, have them descaled regularly.

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An examination of the oral cavity may also reveal the presence of stomatitis and small ulcers. These inflammations are either caused solely by a localized disease or they are the result of a generalized disease. They are generally benign, causing only increased salivation and irritation when food is grasped.

Among the more common lesions is ranula. This strange term, in fact, refers to the formation of a saliva pocket between the jawbone and the flews. It forms in response to an obstruction of the salivary gland ducts. Depending on the nature of the obstruction and the amount of liquid collected, the veterinarian may decide to remove the salivary glands. These lesions are sometimes observed on the neck, which indicates an obstruction high up in the salivary glands.

Dogs are often in the habit of playing with anything. Careful attention must be paid in particular to pieces of wood that can tear the palate. These tears are known as traumatic palatine fissures. Sometimes congenital palatine fissures can be observed. They bring the nasal and oral cavities into contact, causing vomiting and respiratory difficulty. Finally, some dog breeds with short noses, such as boxers and Pekinese, may suffer from a defect of the soft palate. In addition to the snoring that this defect may cause, it also gives rise to difficulty breathing, especially with effort.

Finally, the oral cavity is often injured as a result of traffic accidents or falls. The lower jaw may sustain fractures from the impact, which causes insufferable pain. Generally, these fractures can be repaired in a satisfactory manner.

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Posted in Home Post Date 04/10/2021


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